XDoclet in Action
Craig Walls and Norman Richards
  • November 2003
  • ISBN 9781932394054
  • 624 pages

This is the first serious XDoclet book, and the authors got it right!

Michael Yuan, JavaWorld Author

Are you tired of writing the same Java code, over and over again? XDoclet will take the burden of repetitive development tasks off your shoulders by automating them. XDoclet is a metadata-driven, code generation engine for Java. Starting from simple JavaDoc-style comments, it generates deployment descriptors, interfaces, framework classes and other utility classes your project requires.

XDoclet in Action is an easy to read introduction to XDoclet and its uses. It is a resource on code generation with this popular open source tool. With many short code examples and a full-scale J2EE example, the book shows you how to use XDoclet with EJBs, Servlets, JMX, and other technologies. You'll also learn how to customize XDoclet beyond its out-of-the-box capabilities to generate code specific to your application.

With this book you will learn how to write less code, how to keep your application components in sync, and how to keep your deployment, interface, utility and other information all in one place.

What's inside

  • Introduction to XDoclet
  • Best practices and techniques
  • How to customize XDoclet
  • Generate code for
    • EJB
    • Servlets
    • Struts and WebWork
    • JDO
    • Hibernate

About the authors

Craig Walls, an XDoclet project committer, has been a software developer since 1994 and a Java fanatic since 1996. He lives in Dallas, Texas. Norman Richards has ten years' software development experience, and has worked with code generation for much of that time. He is an avid XDoclet user and evangelist. Norman lives in Austin, Texas.


eBook $35.99 PDF only

FREE domestic shipping on three or more pBooks

XDoclet is the missing link for complex code generation ... This book will quickly teach you how to build and deploy J2EE projects with just a click.

Daniel Brookshier, author of "JXTA: Java P2P Programming"

I learned a lot reading it ... I was immediately filled with new ideas on how to use XDoclet. It’s perfect.

Rickard Öberg, inventor of EJBdoclet

The patterns described make a lot of sense to me ... I've done things the hard way in the past.

Nathan Egge, Argon Engineering

... a fantastic job ... written clearly and effectively, with humor too.

Erik Hatcher, co-author of "Java Development With Ant"