Making Sense of Java
A guide for managers and the rest of us
Bruce Simpson, John Mitchell, Brian Christeson, Rehan Zaidi, and Jonathan Levine
  • June 1996
  • ISBN 9781884777244
  • 180 pages
  • printed in black & white
This title is out of print and no longer for sale.

The meteoric rise of interest in Java, and the simultaneous rise in Java-related hype, make this book's no-nonsense evaluation essential reading for all levels of professionals, from managers to programmers. Making Sense of Java clearly and concisely explains the concepts, features, benefits, potential, and limitations of Java. It is not a programmer's how-to guide and assumes little technical knowledge, though software developers will find this lucid overview to be a valuable introduction to the possible uses and capabilities of Java.

What's inside:

  • How Java's features and functionality stack up against the competition
  • Java applets and their impact on the Internet
  • Will Java become a general-purpose programming language?
  • Performance, productivity, and security issues
  • Copyrights, patents, and intellectual rights
  • Supporting software and technologies
  • The future of Java

What's inside

  • How Java's features and functionality stack up against the competition
  • Java applets and their impact on the Internet
  • Will Java become a general-purpose programming language?
  • Performance, productivity, and security issues
  • Copyrights, patents, and intellectual rights
  • Supporting software and technologies
  • The future of Java

About the reader

It is not a programmer's how-to guide and assumes little technical knowledge, though software developers will find this lucid overview to be a valuable introduction to the possible uses and capabilities of Java.

About the author

Bruce Simpson, John Mitchell, Brian Christeson, Rehan Zaidi, and Jonathan Levine -- consultants, programmers, managers -- are all active participants in the Java maelstrom.