Bitter EJB

Bruce Tate, Mike Clark, Bob Lee, Patrick Linskey

2003 | 440 pages
ISBN: 1930110952

Out of Print $44.95 Softbound print + eBook
$35.99 eBook edition (PDF only)

"The book's informal tone offers a refreshing change from the ubiquitous preachiness of other EJB tomes. It's pragmatic and doesn't tap dance around the fact that EJBs are often used incorrectly in enterprise development... it's an effective way to avoid the potholes that have forced developers off track in the past."
-- Software Development Magazine


RESOURCES

DESCRIPTION

In Bitter EJB, Bruce Tate and his co-authors continue the entertaining and engaging writing style of relating true-life adventure sport experiences to antipattern themes established in Bruce's first book, the best selling Bitter Java.

This more advanced book explores antipatterns, or common traps, within the context of EJB technology.

EJB is experiencing the mixture of practical success and controversy that accompanies a new and quickly-changing framework. Bitter EJB takes the swirling EJB controversies head-on. It offers a practical approach to design: how to become a better programmer by studying problems and solutions to the most important problems surrounding the technology.

The flip side of design patterns, antipatterns, are a fun and interesting way to take EJB expertise to the next level. The book covers many different aspects of EJB, from transactions to persistence to messaging, as well as performanceand testing.

Bitter EJB will teach programmers to do the following:

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Bruce Tate's consulting career spans fifteen years, including a ten-year stint at IBM. He's now an independent consult in Austin, TX where he works with the Middleware Company and other clients to promote and teach effective Java design. He wrote the smash hit, Bitter Java as the first of Manning's Bitter books.

Mike Clark is president of Clarkware Consulting, Inc. in Denver, CO. He has been crafting software professionally since 1992, immersed in Java since 1997.

Bob Lee, an independent consultant and open source developer working out of St. Louis, MO, has over 10 years of software development experience. Bob hosts a Java-themed web log at http://crazybob.org/; feel free to visit and join Bob in his ongoing bitter journey.

Patrick Linskey is the VP of Engineering for a Java persistence company called SolarMetric in Washington, DC. He's spent the last two years building a company to offer Java persistence alternatives to the Java community.

BACK COVER

"... wonderful writing style ... one of the most enjoyable technical reads ... explanation of the concepts is easy to absorb, entertaining, informative, and to the point."
—Dave Wiltz, SBC Global

"... helps you cut through the hype surrounding enterprise Java development."
—John D. Crabtree, Taliant Software

"They know their stuff, and that is obvious."
—Jack Herrington, Code Generation Network

"... an awesome read."
—Barry Nowak, GFS Marketplace

"... helps you spot the dead-ends and points you in the right direction, before you start tearing your hair out."
—Jon Skeet, Peramon Technology

Enterprise JavaBeans—the server-side core of J2EE application development—has been both hailed as the savior of Java enterprise programming and cursed as the bane of Java development. Complexity brings power, but it can also lead to confusion and frustration. What are the best ways to become productive with EJB?

Bitter EJB addresses the controversy head on. The authors identify and explain common EJB traps and distill them into "antipatterns." These antipatterns encapsulate for you some of the most important EJB problems, from persistence to performance. With a clear understanding of what not to do, you will appreciate the value of the detailed best practices recommended in the book.

What's Inside

Bruce Tate is a consultant and frequent conference speaker who promotes and teaches effective Java design. Mike Clark, president of Clarkware Consulting, helps teams build better software faster. Bob Lee is an independent consultant and open source developer. Patrick Linskey is the VP Engineering for SolarMetric, which offers Java persistence alternatives to the Java community.

SAMPLE CHAPTERS

Two sample chapters of Bitter EJB are available in PDF format. You need Adobe's free Acrobat Reader software to view it. You may download Acrobat Reader here.

Download Chapter 6
Download Chapter 9

WHAT REVIEWERS ARE SAYING

"A good addition to the library of any J2EE developer. ...a good reference for beginners....The antipatterns on session management and EJB Persistence are well described with examples. EJBs are not applicable to all problems and this book will help you identify the problems which they do not solve."
-- Chicago Java Users Group

"Well written... not just a catalog of antipatterns... will really give the reader more insight into EJB."
-- ACM Computing Reviews, February 2004

"...the authors, all seasoned Java developers, have distilled many of their more bitter experiences with J2EE and EJB, and offer this information in the hope that it will help others avoid these 'negative consequences.'"
-- ACM Computing Reviews, January 2004

"The book's informal tone offers a refreshing change from the ubiquitous preachiness of other EJB tomes. It's pragmatic and doesn't tap dance around the fact that EJBs are often used incorrectly in enterprise development... it's an effective way to avoid the potholes that have forced developers off track in the past."
-- Software Development Magazine, December 2003

"a very timely book written by well-known experts in the EJB field...It focuses on 'what not to do' but still encourages developers to come up with liberal...and innovative solutions. ...an excellent book for all EJB developers and other enterprise developers who want to learn from the successes and failures of EJBs."
-- Slashdot.org

"...a must read before you begin an EJB project. It will help prevent design problems from becoming application problems...It goes beyond describing all that can go wrong but what can be done to prevent it or correct it."
-- JavaRanch.com

"The authors have used a unique way to teach concepts that are key to good programming, not to mention to life in general."
-- Gamelan.com/Developer.com

SOURCE CODE

Source code for Bitter EJB is contained in a single ZIP file. Free unzip programs can be found at www.download.com.

Source Code -- 12 KB